* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info
TOPIC: Galaxy Zoo


L

Posts: 129909
Date:
RE: Galaxy Zoo
Permalink  
 


Classifying Every Known Galaxy

Among the most ambitious and successful online "citizen science" projects to date, Galaxy Zoo asks its participants to help classify galaxies by studying images of them online and answering a standard set of questions about their features. For instance: Is the galaxy smooth or bulging? Is it elliptical or spiral? If it's spiral, how many arms does it have, and are they tightly wound or thrown open wide?
Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 129909
Date:
Permalink  
 

Title: Galaxy Zoo: Bars in Disk Galaxies
Authors: Karen L. Masters (ICG, Portsmouth), Robert C. Nichol (ICG, Portsmouth), Ben Hoyle (ICG, Portsmouth/Barcelona), Chris Lintott (Oxford), Steven Bamford (Nottingham), Edward M. Edmondson (ICG, Portsmouth), Lucy Fortson (Adler Planetarium), William C. Keel (Alabama), Kevin Schawinski (Yale), Arfon Smith (Oxford), Daniel Thomas (ICG, Portsmouth)

We present first results from Galaxy Zoo 2, the second phase of the highly successful Galaxy Zoo project. Using a volume-limited sample of 13665 disk galaxies (0.01< z < 0.06 and M_r<-19.38), we study the fraction of galaxies with bars as a function of global galaxy properties like colour, luminosity and bulge prominence. Overall, 29.40.5% of galaxies in our sample have a bar, in excellent agreement with previous visually-classified samples of galaxies (although this overall fraction is lower than measured by automated bar-finding methods). We see a clear increase in the bar fraction with redder (g-r) colours, decreased luminosity and in galaxies with more prominent bulges, to the extent that over half of the red, bulge-dominated, disk galaxies in our sample possess a bar. We see evidence for a colour bi-modality for our sample of disk galaxies, with a "red sequence" that is both bulge and bar-dominated, and a "blue cloud" which has little, or no, evidence for a (classical) bulge or bar. These results are consistent with similar trends for barred galaxies at higher redshift in the COSMOS survey, and with early studies using the RC3. We discuss these results in the context of internal (secular) galaxy evolution scenarios and the possible links to the formation of classical bulges (which have a de Vaucouleurs profile) and pseudo-bulges (with exponential profiles) in disk galaxies.

Read more (147kb. PDF)

__________________


L

Posts: 129909
Date:
Permalink  
 

The Galaxy Zoo project has produced the first scientific results.
Karen Masters and her team from Portsmouth have submitted the first paper using Zoo
2 data to the MNRAS journal.


In this work we used an early look at the information you have provided us on the presence of bars in a sample of GZ2 galaxies too look at trends of the bar fraction (basically how likely a certain type of disk galaxy is to have a bar) as a function of other properties.
Read more

Ed ~ If you have participated in the project remember to fill in your name on the galaxy zoo site if you want to be credited on the paper.

__________________


L

Posts: 129909
Date:
Zooniverse
Permalink  
 


Zooniverse launch

After a huge amount of work behind the scene, we're proud to open wide the doors of the Zooniverse. The Zooniverse's aim is to provide a home for a whole suite of projects which will enable anyone with a web browser to contribute to science. Whether you're inspired to classify galaxies, hunt supernovae, or take part in one of the projects which will launch over the coming weeks and months, we hope that Zooniverse will help you find a project that's right for you
Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 129909
Date:
Galaxy Zoo Mergers
Permalink  
 


Galaxy Zoo Mergers

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 129909
Date:
RE: Galaxy Zoo
Permalink  
 


It's no secret we live in a world of information overload. With satellite images producing more information in one day than a person could analyse in several months, and millions of galaxies and other objects in space waiting to be classified and categorized, scientists are struggling to find new, transformative ways of doing their jobs.
Enter citizen scientists.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 129909
Date:
Permalink  
 

Galaxy Zoo: Understanding Cosmic Mergers
Starting at midnight 11/24, our new site 'Galaxy Zoo: Understanding Cosmic Mergers' went on-line as a new project in Galaxy Zoo. In Mergers, we are working to understand the cosmic collisions that lead to galaxy mergers. Every day we will have a new target galaxy that we need your help to model. Based on the basic input parameters that we provide, a Java applet running in your browser will simulate some possible collision scenarios. Computers don't do a good job comparing simulations and real astronomical images, so we need your help to find out which simulations are the most similar to the real galaxy collision.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 129909
Date:
Permalink  
 

Supernova Hunt Underway Again

For those of you who took part in the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Hunt back in August - good news: the site is now back live, with an improved tutorial and interface. We hope that you like the changes that we have made.
Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 129909
Date:
Permalink  
 


It is now a whole lot easier for people to share their favourite galaxies from Galaxy Zoo. Our new mashup allows users to generate WorldWide Telescope virtual sky tours of their favourites with just a few clicks. This video shows you how our interface works. Full version available Wednesday, September 2.




__________________


L

Posts: 129909
Date:
Permalink  
 

Asteroids on Galaxy Zoo
Galaxy Zoo is a highly successful citizen science project. It harness the power of the internet and the great ability of human brain to recognise patterns and shapes (something computers are notoriously hard to "teach") to classify a million of galaxies. The data is provided by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) using a dedicated 2.5 m f/5 modified Ritchey-Chretien altitude-azimuth telescope located at Apache Point Observatory, in south east New Mexico.

Read more

__________________
«First  <  1 2 3 4  >  Last»  | Page of 4  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard