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TOPIC: Ancient Britains


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Hillforts
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Online hillforts atlas maps all 4,147 in Britain and Ireland for the first time

Dotted across the landscape of Britain and Ireland, hillforts have been part of our story for millennia and for the first time a new online atlas launched today captures all of their locations and key details in one place.
A research team based at the universities of Oxford, Edinburgh and University College Cork has been helped by citizen scientists from across England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Ireland.
The result can be found here.

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RE: Ancient Britains
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Stone Age people 'roasted rodents for food'

Rodents appear to have been roasted for food by Stone Age people as early as 5,000 years ago, archaeological evidence suggests.
Bones from archaeological sites in Orkney show voles were cooked or boiled for food, or possibly for pest control.
This is the first evidence for the exploitation of rodents by Neolithic people in Europe, say scientists.

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Ancient Britons
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Ancient Britons' teeth reveal people were 'highly mobile' 4,000 years ago

Archaeologists have created a new database from the teeth of prehistoric humans found at ancient burial sites in Britain and Ireland that tell us a lot about their climate, their diet and even how far they may have travelled. In a paper, led by Dr Maura Pellegrini from the University of Oxford, researchers say that individuals in prehistoric Britain were highly mobile.
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RE: Ancient Britains
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Inverness West Link: Artefacts unearthed by road works

A prehistoric arrowhead, pieces of pottery and the remains of an ancient roundhouse have been uncovered during road works in Inverness.
Archaeologists have been closely monitoring the construction of the city's new West Link Road for artefacts.

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Bronze Age houses uncovered in Cambridgeshire 'best ever'

Archaeologists have uncovered what they believe to be the "best-preserved Bronze Age dwellings ever found in Britain".
The circular wooden houses, built on stilts, form part of a settlement at Must Farm quarry, in Cambridgeshire, and date to about 1000-800 BC.
A fire destroyed the posts, causing the houses to fall into a river where silt helped preserve the contents.
 
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Oldest UK case of rickets in Neolithic Tiree skeleton

The earliest known case of rickets in the UK has been identified in a 3,000-year-old skeleton found in Scotland.
The disease, caused by Vitamin D deficiency linked to lack of sunlight, can lead to weak and deformed bones. It was identified in the remains of a Neolithic woman who had been buried on the Scottish island of Tiree.

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Who do you think you really are? A genetic map of the British Isles

By constructing the first fine-scale map of the British Isles, Oxford University researchers have uncovered distinct geographical groupings of genetically similar individuals across the UK.
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3,500-year-old basket excavated at North Uist beach

The prehistoric basket was discovered in an area of shoreline where the sea has been eroding the land at Baleshare in North Uist.
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Iron Age bronze helmet found on Canterbury farmland

A rare Iron Age helmet unearthed by a metal detector enthusiast on farmland near Canterbury has been described as a significant find by the British Museum.
The bronze helmet was found with bone fragments, and had been used to hold human remains after a cremation, Canterbury Archaeological Trust said.

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Charcoal clues to Assynt's Bronze Age woodland

Analysis of charcoal at the site of a suspected Bronze Age "sauna" suggests the surrounding area hosted a rich and diverse woodland.
Archaeologists have been examining what is called a burnt mound at Stronechrubie, in Assynt.

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