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TOPIC: Ancient Britains


L

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Echline Mesolithic home
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Scottish dig unearths '10,000-year-old home' at Echline

The remains of what is believed to be one of Scotland's earliest homes have been uncovered during construction works for the new Forth crossing.
The site dates from the Mesolithic period, about 10,000 years ago.
Archaeological excavation works have been taking place in a field at Echline in South Queensferry in preparation for the Forth Replacement Crossing.

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RE: Ancient Britains
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Ancient 'sauna' unearthed in Assynt

Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of what they believe could be an Bronze Age bathing site, or a sauna.
The metre-deep pit with a channel to a nearby stream was discovered at Stronechrubie, Assynt, in the north west Highlands.
The find was made by the Fire and Water Project, which is run by archaeology and history group Historic Assynt.

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L

Posts: 129909
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Ancient Britons
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 Welsh people could be most ancient in UK, DNA suggests

Welsh people could lay claim to be the most ancient Britons, according to scientists who have drawn up a genetic map of the British Isles.
Research suggests the Welsh are genetically distinct from the rest of mainland Britain.
Professor Peter Donnelly, of Oxford University, said the Welsh carry DNA which could be traced back to the last Ice Age, 10,000 years ago.

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RE: Ancient Britains
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 Archaeologists in Oban discover Bronze Age was height of cool

They had fridges, state-of-the-art heating systems and possibly even access to a sauna. Archaeologists have discovered that Bronze Age people, at a settlement on the west coast of Scotland dating back up to 4,000 years, had a range of mod cons that would be envied by home owners today.
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Hallaton helmet unveiled after nine-year restoration

What has been hailed as one of the most significant recent UK Iron Age finds is going on display after a nine-year conservation project.
The decorated Roman cavalry helmet was discovered at a site in Leicestershire.

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Archaeological Discovery on Crosby Beach

Prehistoric human footprints, thought to date back thousands of years, have been discovered on Crosby beach.
Recent high tides have exposed the rare archaeoligical phenomenon - similar to those found for many years in silt beds on Formby beach.
Members of the public are now being asked to help monitor the coastal prints, in Crosby and Formby, as part of the Sefton Coast Landscape Partnership Scheme.

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Posts: 129909
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Neolithic camp
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Roger Hall discovered a handful of strange-shaped rocks while walking his pet pooch in picturesque Cannock Wood, Staffordshire,
But experts have identified them as flint 'flakes' - the off-cuts from tools crafted by Stone Age Man an astonishing 4,000 years ago.
If confirmed, they could mark the spot of the only neolithic camp known in our region.

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RE: Ancient Britains
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New study of Western Isles' sand dune-buried artefacts

New research is being carried out on artefacts recovered from a site where evidence was found for every age from the Neolithic to the 20th Century.
Archaeology at Udal provides an "unbroken timeline" of occupation from the Neolithic, Bronze Age, Iron Age, Viking, Medieval through to the 1900s.
Some of the evidence at the site on North Uist was preserved by wind-blown sand dunes.
Archaeologist Ian Crawford excavated Udal between 1963 and 1995.
The earliest Neolithic layers he revealed consisted of a line of stones with a large upright stone nicknamed the great auk stone because of its resemblance to the extinct seabird.

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Archaeologists unearth treasure trove from across the ages in Argyll
   
A routine archaeological survey at a planned housing development has uncovered a treasure trove of Iron and Bronze Age artefacts.
The find, on a hillside near Oban, includes a Neolithic axe-head dating back 5,000 to 6,000 years, three roundhouses around 2,500 to 3,000 years old and the remains of an 18th-century farmstead and metalwork store.
Other objects include a hoard of stone tools dating back 3,000 years, hundreds of fragments of Bronze Age and late 18th- century pottery, plus a clay pipe from around 1760-1820.

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Posts: 129909
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Biggar Archaeology Group
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Biggar Archaeology Group - Daer Excavation

The excavations at Daer as covered in the "Digging for Britain" series Sept 2011. Looks like Biggar Archaeology Group have found the Mesolithic/ Neolithic holy grail in the peat strewn hills of Upper Clydesdale. Great to see some national media attention and recognition for the work done by Tam Ward and the Biggar Archaeology Group.



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