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TOPIC: Ancient Britains


L

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RE: Ancient Britains
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An Iron Age site on North Uist which is seriously threatened by coastal erosion is gradually revealing more of its secrets in a race against time.
Community volunteers and professional archaeologists are uncovering part of a wheelhouse settlement first exposed at Sloc Sabhaid on Baleshare beach in 2005.

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Links of Noltland
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Links of Noltland is the archaeological site of a Neolithic village near Grobust Bay on the north coast of Westray in Orkney, Scotland.
Excavations at the site (HY428492) in the 1980s found a Neolithic building, which is now in the care of Historic Scotland who are funding further excavation. In 2009 the Westray Wife was discovered, a lozenge-shaped figurine that is believed to be the earliest representation of a human face ever found in Scotland.

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Latitude: 5919'35.49"N, Longitude: 3 0'4.24"W

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Creswell Crags
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Creswell Crags is a valley in limestone rock with a watercourse (Millward Brook) running through it and caves on either side. The National Grid Reference is SK 535 742. The caves were hollowed out by the action of water seeping underground. The rock is a band of Magnesian limestone that stretches from the southwest in Derbyshire to northeast in Yorkshire, running through the northwest of Nottinghamshire.
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Creswell Crags is a limestone gorge on the border between Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, England near the villages of Creswell, Whitwell and Elmton. The cliffs of the ravine contain several caves that were occupied during the last ice age, between around 43,000 and 10,000 years ago.
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Happisburgh
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Happisburgh - first known settlement in northern Europe

Archaeological excavations on Happisburgh Beach have revealed that ancient humans lived in Britain more than 800,000 years ago, making them the earliest northern Europeans.
Life was tough for these early pioneers, living close to the cold northern pine forests. There were few edible plants and animals to hunt, harsh winters, and rhino and hyaena on the prowl too.
Evidence for this first known settlement in northern Europe was uncovered from the site at Happisburgh by a team of scientists and archaeologists from institutes including the Natural History Museum, the British Museum, University College London and Queen Mary, University of London.

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Latitude: 5249'29.34"N, Longitude: 132'9.17"E

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RE: Ancient Britains
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Queen of the Inch to be re-interred

A 4,000-year-old skeleton, known as the Queen of the Inch, is to be re-interred in the tiny island of Inchmarnock in the Firth of Clyde.
The grave was found by a farmer in the 1950s as he ploughed a field.
Preserved in an ancient cist, the remains included a necklace and dagger.
Despite being examined by archaeologists and reburied in the 1960s, the skeleton was recently exhumed and studied using modern research techniques.

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A linguistic mystery has arisen surrounding symbol-inscribed stones in Scotland that predate the formation of the country itself.
The stones are believed to have been carved by members of an ancient people known as the Picts, who thrived in what is now Scotland from the 4th to the 9th Centuries.
These symbols, researchers say, are probably "words" rather than images.
But their conclusions have raised criticism from some linguists.

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Zuthos
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According to Diodorus Siculus, the ancient Britons grew grain, barley and they made beer out of it, which he calls "zythos".

Several classical authors suggest that "beer" (malt liquor), cider and mead were the indigenous beverages and that heavy drinking to intoxications was common. Diodorus Siculus (V.26.1- 27)6, the early 1st Century B. C.7 historian, describes the Gauls - Celts - as drinking "beer" (zythos) made of barley and "the washings of honey, probably mead", and becoming drunk on imported wine.
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Orkney Venus
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Second Orkney Venus found at Orkney dig

Archaeologists have unearthed a second ancient figurine at a dig on Orkney.
The discovery was made at the same site as the Orkney Venus, the earliest representation of a human figure to be found in Scotland.

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RE: Ancient Britains
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Researchers have discovered stone tools in Norfolk, UK, that suggest that early humans arrived in Britain nearly a million years ago - or even earlier.
The find, published in the journal Nature, pushes back the arrival of the first humans in what is now the UK by several hundred thousand years.

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Ancient man ventured into northern Europe far earlier than previously thought, settling on England's east coast more than 800,000 years ago, scientists said.
It had been assumed that humans - thought to have emerged from Africa around 1.75 million years ago - kept mostly to relatively warm tropical forests, steppes and Mediterranean areas as they spread across Eurasia.
But the discovery of a collection of flint tools some 220 kilometres northeast of London shows that quite early on man braved colder climes.

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